A Peek Into Narnia

 

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One of the things we love about the Narnia series is the magical wardrobe. Throughout the stories, Lewis is asking us to consider that reality includes more than what we see in our daily lives. The conversation the Pevensie children have with the Professor is revealing. Their younger sister, Lucy, insists that she has discovered another world and her siblings find it hard to believe…

How do you know your sister’s story is not true?” the Professor asks them.

“Why don’t they teach logic at these schools? There are only three possibilities. Either your sister is telling lies, or she is mad, or she is telling the truth. You know she doesn’t tell lies, and it is obvious that she is not mad. For the moment then, and unless any further evidence turns up, we must assume that she is telling the truth.”

Of course, Lewis used this same logical reasoning to argue for the truth of Christianity in many of his literary works.  He hadn’t found any evidence to suggest that the person called Jesus of Nazareth was a liar or a lunatic. At the age of 32, he became convinced that Jesus’ claims about this life and the next were true and became “the most reluctant convert it all of England”. If you’re interested, you can read more about his life here.

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I found this used jewelry box at Good Will for $3. It reminded me of a wardrobe, so I set out to create a peek into Narnia!

The background was painted with acrylics mixed with gel medium for better blending.IMG_6683

 

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I painted the trees with artificial snow from Hobby Lobby. This scene needs to look wintery!

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Next, I flocked miniature pine trees using a spray adhesive (sprayed outside) and then rolling them in artificial snow to coat.

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Glued the trees in with the hot glue gun and cut two small hills out of styrofoam so the ground wasn’t so flat.

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These tiny .05 mm acrylic stones added frosty sparkle!

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A map of Narnia was printed from my computer and trimmed to fit inside the door frames.


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And these wood cutouts added a whimsical look to the corners.

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Using brad rings and two snowflake charms, I created handles for the doors.
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Covered the bottom of the scene with an artificial blanket of snow and then glued more powdered snow over it. On the inside of the doors I adhered photos of fur coats, covered with translucent vellum.

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Found a Victorian style lamp post on Amazon!

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The lovely music accompanying this post is “The Wardrobe” by Harry Gregson-Williams.

Thanks for stopping by to look inside the wardrobe! Have a blessed week ~Scarlett

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“Kicked Out of Church” on DesiringGod.org

I was kicked out of church a few years ago.

I didn’t create any art about it when it happened, but I’ve continued to think about it a lot. It changed my life.

There are so many ways we can communicate what is in our hearts and minds: drawing, painting, singing, acting….

In trying to share this story, writing seemed like the best medium. You can read the story at Desiring God.

Thank you for taking the time to stop by and I hope you have a blessed week.

~Scarlett

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Metaphysics of Van Til in Pen and Paint

 

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Cornelius Van Til was a professor at Westminister Theological Seminary for 43 years.  These art pieces attempt to give visual reference to his metaphysical views regarding theism and atheism.

“Van Til . . . always taught that a Christian worldview should be represented by two circles (for Creator and creature), clearly distinct from one another, with the larger one (representing God) on top.  One circle alone referred to the non-Christian worldview, in which man and God (if he exists) are on the same level, part of one reality.”
— John Frame, Cornelius Van Til:  An Analysis of His Thought, (Phillipsburg, NJ:  Presbyterian and Reformed Publishing, 1995), p. 27.

 

Here is my attempt to show Van Til’s “Creator-Creature” distinctions in paint and pen.  And if you’re thinking they are nothing more than extravagant flash-cards, you’re right! I can say one thing for creating art about philosophical concepts: It helps me remember them for class!
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Merry Christmas, Saint Louis!


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The Crusader Bible, currently on view at the Blanton Museum of Art, features 13th century French gothic manuscripts, as well as armor and manuscript making materials.  The exhibit runs til April 3rd, 2016.

I had the chance to spend some time at the exhibit this week and have been absolutely amazed at the fine details in the pictures!  I used images from medieval manuscripts as inspiration for this hand-drawn nativity. Cutting out several images from colored copies, I composed a scene full of characters.

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These pictures are from the Crusader Bible, attributed to the court of King Louis IX.  Quickly, the composition became crowded! Then I tried to add a banner with ‘Merry Christmas’ in French.

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It was a lot harder to draw these tiny little figures than I thought!

Some shiny gold leaf gave it a festive look…

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I wish you all a blessed and safe Christmas season and a Happy New Year!  ~Scarlett
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Angels Do Wonderful Things

 


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Music I listened to while working on this painting:

“Fly” by Ludovico Einaudi

You can listen on the MusicPlayer at the top of this post.

Thoughts for this piece:

St. Thomas Aquinas, Summa Theologica, Question #108 Hierarchies and Orders of the Angels

“As we have noticed, our human knowledge of angels is not direct and perfect; we cannot know angels as they are in themselves. In our imperfect way, we assign many angels to each order, even while we realize that, since each angel is a complete species, it has its own specific office, and, to that extent, its own order. We cannot discern what these specific offices and orders are. If star differ from star in glory, much more does angel differ from angel. Our classification of angelic orders is, therefore, a kind of general classification.”

Is there an order of angels that inspire artists? Do angels paint?  If so, can they use light as a medium?

 

Thanks for stopping by to look at my art ~Scarlett