Facebook Drawings

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I post a lot of drawings on Facebook.

No planning, erasing, correcting, or changing. Just sketch+post.

You can, too.  Forget what anyone else thinks.  Who cares?

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I used to get discouraged and think you had to go to art school to be an artist.

But you don’t.


Drawing doesn’t even take much time if your drawings are small.IMG_20140408_181734

If you decided sometime in the past that you can’t draw, that’s ok.  I’m not a great artist by any stretch, but I still draw.  Why not?DSCF2448

Some of my drawings are rough ideas and I try to get them drawn quickly before I forget them.

Get a pencil and some paper.  Draw whatever comes to mind.  It’s fun and reduces stress.


It can help you communicate without words.

When you start feeling like your drawings are not good enough, take a trip to a contemporary art gallery.  There are sure to be some pieces you don’t like.  

Let the realization hit you: It’s not possible for everyone to like your stuff.

Then draw in that freedom.


Here’s my drawing of Facebook on Facebook


What would yours look like?


Linoleum Block Icon Print

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There’s an Icon exhibit coming up at a nearby church I’ve been visiting.  I decided to turn this drawing into a stamp.

And then, just as I was about to start, I remembered how easily the last stamp split and cracked after a few uses.

So I decided to carve it into a linoleum block. I traced the drawing *(reduced by 50%) onto the block using red transfer paper and a stylus…



Ready to carve…


I carefully carved along the lines with the second smallest cutter tip I had. My set is the standard Speedball set you find at craft stores.  I also used Speedball brayer and printing inks.


Will I ever learn!?






I tried this aged parchment first, but it was too bumpy for a clear print…



The first printing was not clear, so I kept trying on different papers.

Yes, I really do my art in the kitchen, as you see here. No studio (yet).






Hope you’re having a good week, I’m off to the store to buy more band-aids.  ~Scarlettmadonna of the owl print



Candy Corn Queen 2014


This year’s Candy Corn Queen is Celtic~

As always, I started with some sketching to work out the composition.


I decided to stylize the drawing (see below). I used ZIG pens and Copic markers to color the copy I made onto aged parchment.

This year’s Queen, while a warrior, also features small delicate butterflies with candy corn, in memory of my precious Knox.  It’s been 8 months since Knox went to heaven.  My head was always brimming with ideas when he was with me.  I began designing a queen to celebrate my favorite fall candy the year he was born. You can see the previous Queens here: 2010  2011  2012  2013.  This is the 5th Candy Corn Queen and I look forward to it every year!  Don’t forget to visit Knox’s Etsy shop if you’d like to order some cards. All proceeds go to Cockayne Syndrome research and family support.

Take a second to like my FB page and see daily sketches, works in progress, and photos of my elementary art class’s weekly art projects.

Happy Fall ~DSCF0447

I used George Bain’s terrific book on Celtic designs as a reference when stylizing my sketch…









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CCQ 2014

The Dead Dove

When people see this image they respond in different ways. Some have said it’s a photograph full of sadness, that it’s hard to look at.  Some say it’s foreboding, an ill omen of days to come.  Other are more pragmatic: The dove flew into the window and fell down dead. That’s it. It meant nothing.

My response is to turn it into art.  I can’t say that I like the image, but I also can’t deny that it holds immense significance for me.  That’s my baby. The diagnosis of his terminal illness came shortly after this dove flew into my window and died.  It’s a profound moment in time if you think about it and I wonder at myself for having had the wherewithall to get my camera and capture it.


I tried scraping the color away with an x-acto knife to add texture.  I liked the effect at first, but by the time I got to Knox’s face, I was crying a lot and I didn’t want to scrape any more.  Any image of him, whether photographed or drawn, is precious to me.

I left it alone.


Grieving my baby boy is hard work.  It’s exhausting.   The rough days at the end of his life are still bothering me and I can’t  stop thinking about what I might have done differently.  Sometimes all I want is to do is to go to sleep and not feel the pain for a little while.  But as soon as I open my eyes, there it is again.  The empty crib, the silent room, the ache of another day without hearing his voice.