Miniature Monet Magnets


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In my last post, I showed you how I created these tiny 2 inch paintings, inspired by Monet.

Here’s what I did with them next!

I put out paper towels on my table and covered them with a large sheet of wax paper.

Then I got some incredible stuff called Art Resin
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After mixing equal amounts of the two-part kit together in a plastic cup, I stirred thoroughly for a couple of minutes with a wooden skewer.

Then I poured the resin directly onto the canvases.  Each canvas took about 1 tablespoon of resin.
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I smoothed the resin gently over the canvas with the side of the skewer, taking it over the edges. DSCF2940Using the pointed end of the skewer, I popped a few tiny air bubbles in the resin…

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And I let them dry overnight. They are super smooth with a thick, glossy finish.

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I recycled an old magnetic calendar by cutting it up and gluing squares to the backs of the canvases.DSCF2945DSCF2973

Monet Magnets!

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Can’t wait to try more projects with ArtResin!  Check out their web site and see all the amazing things you can do with this awesome stuff!

Hop over and like my FB page for daily sketches, photos, and artistic adventures!

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Miniature Monet Paintings

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These tiny 2 inch square canvases are perfect for painting miniature Monet waterlilies.

First, I painted them with clear gesso and pulled out some Monet books for inspiration…

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My technique was simple:

1. Stipple background in soft colors with a stencil brush.  (made transparent by mixing acrylic with gel medium)

2. Fingerpaint water lilies in greens. (large lilies with the pad of my finger, smaller ones with tip)

3. Add outlines around lily pads and paint lilies with small brush. ( having some Monet books to look at helps)

That’s it! As you experiment with colors and sizes of flowers, each one turns out different.

Here are five miniature paintings I made using these 3 steps…
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Sometimes I mix colors with my fingers.  It’s messier but faster!
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The perfect shade!DSCF2775 DSCF2780 DSCF2796 DSCF2806 DSCF2812

The large stippling brush keeps the background from looking too solid and allows you to create lines in the paint, to show movement of the water…
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Finger-painting the lily pads…

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Adding details with the tiny spotter brush….DSCF2827 DSCF2832 DSCF2833

This was the picture I used as a reference.
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Once you start, it’s hard to stop because each one is so pretty.DSCF2846 DSCF2849 DSCF2852 DSCF2903 DSCF2861 DSCF2895

Be sure and like my FB page so you can see extra photos of all my projects and weekly sketches, museum exhibit info, and more!

I’m also asking for suggestions on what I should do with these tiny paintings.  Make them into necklaces? Pins?  Let me know what you think!

Thanks for stopping by and many thanks to all of you who pin my posts.  ~Scarlett
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Easy Self-Portraits for Kids

 

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Didn’t these turn out awesome!?  It’s an easy and rewarding self-portrait project for students!

Graphite paper is the key to allowing younger students to obtain a good likeness of themselves. I found some good graphite paper at Hobby Lobby, next to the pencils in the art supply section.

My  young artists ranged from 2nd – 4th grade and we did this as an end-of-the-year project on our last day of school.

Process:

1. You will need photos of each student printed out on 8.5 x 11 paper. I took pics on my phone the week before and got them printed at Office Max. They don’t need to be in color.

2. Teach the students to use graphite paper to transfer their likeness onto white cardstock.

*Eyes, irises and pupils, eyebrows, bottom line of nose, lips, face outline and outline of hair and clothing.

Make a Graphite Sandwich:

*White cardstock on the bottom

*Graphite paper on top (shiny side down)

*Their photo on the top

*Use masking tape to tape your graphite “sandwich” to the table so the photo doesn’t shift when they trace their features. We used pencils to trace features.

3.Go over traced lines with black Sharpie.

4. Divide hair into sections. Odd numbers look best.

5. Add lines, curved and moving along the lines of the head and face. They can be creative and add any patterns they like.

6. Color with markers.

*It’s best not to trace the teeth. It looks weird.

Here are process photos for the sample I made for them to look at. I also made a second one using different colors.  There are so many fun ways to color and add patterns to your pop-art self portrait! Have fun!

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Instruct students NOT to trace the teeth. I left them out on the second sample and I like it much better!DSCF2466
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Be sure and like my FB page to see all my artistic adventures this summer!

 

Needle Case Valentines

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Needle cases are the perfect containers for small notes. Slip them in a purse or pocket, and surprise your Valentine with a tiny expression of love.

Available in craft stores and online, you can find needle cases in several styles and sizes. I ordered mine from Rita at Sova Enterprises.

I played with inks to see what they would do to the raw wood cases. The first one below was left raw, then I used a light brown, pastel pink, and red ink.

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To keep this project quick and simple, I used decorative tapes and bits of trim for embellishment.

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A tiny sentiment can be rolled up and pushed into the case. Be sure and leave a small bit of the note extended above the top of the case, so the recipient can remove it.
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Happy Birthday Knox ~ 4 Gifts Given and Received

Happy Birthday to my little son in Paradise.  Knox would be 4 years old today.

I think the hardest part is not being able to say “I love you”; not being able to hold him.

He’s been gone 5 and a half months.  I miss him terribly.

Giving gifts of love, in honor of Knox’s birthday, was the only way I could think of to say “I love you”.

First, I went to the store and picked out what I would’ve bought him if he was here.  I associate baby turtles with Knoxy because of a painting I made for him that hung above his crib.

I’m sending these clothes to a precious little boy with severe CS here in the USA,  and another identical set to a little boy with CS in England.  I love you, Knox.

Then I painted a bright turtle for a little girl with CS, also here in America.  I’ll include the process photos and finished piece in the next post. I hope she likes it!

Next, I made a new set of cards and listed them in Knox’s Etsy shop. I’ll continue to make and sell butterfly cards and other original art pieces online to support Amy and Friends CS Support in the UK.  Please visit the shop and pass on the link.  All proceeds are donated. I made a donation last week of $150 from card sales. Thank you to everyone who buys the butterfly cards!

I donated the recent proceeds from Knox’s shop to CS research through Amy and Friend’s “JustGiving” site. If you’d like to make a donation in honor of Knox’s 4th Birthday, please leave a note in the message box so I can thank you.  <3

Finally, I made a donation of books to Dell Children’s Hospital.  Knox loved books!  It’s so nice to have good books to borrow while you’re in the hospital.  I wish I was in the hospital reading a book to Knox now.

I have been given four gifts, as well. I received this gorgeous bracelet from another CS mom right here in Texas.  I absolutely love it!

 

A young artist friend of mine presented me with an amazing graphite drawing of Knox.  I loved it so much I posted it on my FB page. I know how difficult portraits are and how much time it takes to make an accurate likeness.  Thank you so much Miss E. J.! See her wonderful drawing of Knox here.  What a special gift!

Third, a friend sent me a poem he wrote about Knox.  The day it was sent to me, I had been asking the very same question presented in the title:

How Has the World Not Stopped?                                                        (2/11/14)
But I now know
that nothing
escapes a black hole.
That gravity pulls,
slowly at first,
then faster and faster
until the frail shell protecting us
collapses,
and air
no longer
surrounds us
and we are crushed.
Within the heart
of this heaviness
time ceases to exist.
The normal flow of life
is torn on the tiniest snag of circumstance
into spirals of endless repeating memories.
Eventually we’ll be spit out
into an alternate universe,
that expects us to live
as if you no longer exist
and only pities us
when we cling
to the warmth
of your presence.
The strangest part
is
that for those whose path arcs
far
from your massive absence,
life
seems unchanged.
Except,
perhaps,
for a sense of relief
at barely
having
escaped.
(c) 2014  Elwood Fischer

Thank you for this gift, Elwood.  The words are meaningful and I’m blessed.

And the fourth gift was a video.  Knox’s grandmother sent me a video she found on her iPhone of Knox’s first few moments of life. I was struck to the heart with sorrow to see Knox as a newborn again and to hear his cry.  I remember thinking how beautiful he was, and at the same time, there was a feeling of incongruity in the room that I remember, as well.  It didn’t feel like there was anything specifically wrong with Knox in that moment, but something suddenly seemed wrong with life itself.  I still don’t understand it.   The video is hard to watch but it’s a gift I wouldn’t trade.

Happy Birthday my sweet angel ~ I hope you and your Great-Grandmother are enjoying your shared birthday together today and having a wonderful time.

 

Knox,  we love you!