New Butterfly Cards for Cockayne Syndrome

5Two new sets of lovely butterfly cards are in the shop, all proceeds go to medical research for Cockayne Syndrome.

The first set has a “Happy Birthday”,  “Bless Your Heart”, and a blank one for all occassions. You can purchase these cards for medical research here and a small information card on CS will be included.

The second set that has been added to the shop is a set of 3 beautiful “Thank You” cards in similar style. These cards are made with careful attention to detail, permanent adhesive, designer papers, and delicate dimensional accents. Please consider purchasing a set of hand-made cards to further critical research into this tragic disease.

Thanks for looking and have a blessed Memorial Day!
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NEW Greeting Cards listed in Knox’s Shop


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I just added some NEW cards to Knox”s little Etsy shop.  I began the shop to raise money for  medical research back in 2011 and have kept it going in Knox’s memory, and in honor of all the beautiful children with Cockayne Syndrome around the world.

These cards are really unique, made with designer papers and accents. One set has 3 “Thank You” cards included, and the other set features 4 all-occasion cards. All the cards are blank inside, waiting for your personal message. They come with matching kraft envelopes, and will be shipped to you, along with a small information card on Cockayne Syndrome. dscf5836 dscf5837 dscf5839 dscf5840 dscf5849 dscf5851 dscf5854 dscf5846 dscf5857 dscf5856Please consider purchasing hand made greeting cards or original art this holiday season.

All proceeds are sent to medical research for Cockayne Syndrome. Thanks for stopping by!

 

*Music on the player: “Bobcat Pretzel” by John Powell

 

Cockayne Syndrome: A Loving Nature is a Symptom

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It was my birthday last month and I received a priceless gift:

All the videos from Knox’s life on DVDs!   No gift could equal this.

In this stage of grief, watching the happy times we had with Knox is a great comfort. I love watching each and every video, no matter how short.  I watch videos of Knox often and late into the night.

Now I can pop in a DVD and gaze at continuous, chronoligical footage of him on the big screen: my little precious boy with his cute glasses, spikey hair, and rare syndrome most people have never heard of.

But there’s something about the syndrome I’d like to share with you. It’s something that I’ve only recently been able to embrace.

A loving nature is a symptom.

Yes, it really is. A loving nature is considered an actual symptom of the disease.

Dr. Neilan of Boston Children’s Hospital acknowledges this in the documentary “Love Has Wings” (at approx. 23:40) saying, ” Children with Cockayne Syndrome have a very friendly personality, which almost seems to be a characteristic of the disorder.”

How did I miss how remarkable that is?

Admittedly, I could not think about much when Knox was with us. I was so angry at what was happening and I could not accept CS as a blessing while Knox was with us. I remember one of his specialists advising me to consider how preferable CS was to others illnesses shortly after diagnosis.  I thought he was a nut!  Preferable? How could CS be preferable to anything? The diagnosis was terminal, with a lifespan of only 5-7 years. I could not comprehend what the doctor was trying to say.

I had always thought of symptoms as purely negative things. A ‘symptom’ was something in the body not working correctly. Truly, CS children do have severe and heartbreaking symptoms and that can’t be denied. But the symptom I remember most when I think about Knox now is not his blindness, deafness, microcephaly, or neurological deterioration, but his loving nature.

I look back and watch the videos of happy days and there it is!  In every frame captured from his life I can see it clearly: that sweetness of CS.

How could I have been so blessed?

I would’ve chosen life and health for him, but I wasn’t given that choice.  And that still bothers me. My mood can turn dark quickly when memories of his suffering re-surface.  Sadness can still stop me in my tracks and some memories can still make me feel like I can’t breathe. It’s awful.

I’m reminded of something the old Protestant preacher, Jonathan Edwards, said:

“The same sun that causes the brightness of the day at noon, causes the shadows at 3 o’clock”.

I still don’t understand why it happened, but if the shadows had to fall, I’m thankful God gave me Knox. He was a gift in the greatest sense of the word, and it’s my prayer that his loving nature continues to shine through in each video, in each memory, and in my heart.


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Red Poppies, Art for Medical Research

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I’m honored to present this lovely painting of brilliant red poppies by Austin based artist, Katrina King.

This lovely piece is painted on an 8″x8″ gesso board and is ready to brighten up your day!

Many thanks for Katrina for donating this original artwork to Knox’s shop for CS research. All proceeds from the Etsy shop go to research for Cockayne Syndrome.

You can read about my little boy, Knox, who had CS here.

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To purchase this gorgeous painting please click over to the shop! All proceeds from this shop go to medical research  for Cockayne Syndrome– a rare genetic disease causing premature aging in children.

 

Have a wonderful week and thanks for stopping by!  ~Scarlett

“Kill The Disease”-Using a Gun in Art

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Photograph: Standard range target, Permanent marker,  Glock 43,  9 mm pistol.

To learn more about Cockayne Syndrome and how you can help, please visit Share and Care Network (US) or Amy and Friends (UK) for more information.

 

I’ve been thinking about art and media.  With all the talk of gun control in the news lately, it’s hard to avoid the question: To what extent are artists influenced by political agendas?

I know my choice to use a gun in this piece may set people off, but that’s a risk I’m willing to take.  February 1st will mark 2 years since my little boy was killed by mutated genes.

Many artists have used controversial imagery in the name of social justice or progressive ideals. But that’s not what I’m doing.

The target is the canvas. Bullets are the medium.  Shooting is the process.

No liberal agenda here. No conservative agenda, either.

It’s an accurate reflection of my feelings about Cockayne Syndrome and what it did to my son.

And what it’s doing to children all over the world that I love deeply.

There were no other materials that could’ve made this image as powerful. As accurate.

Honestly, it felt good to shoot up the name of this disease.

I drew my gun to draw my pain with bullets, to process the agonizing loss of my son.

What about political agendas in the arts?

I’m confident those truly devoted to freedom in the arts and progressive ideals will understand my process and embrace the way in which I choose to express myself.