If the Quran was a Cookbook-An Allegory

A long time ago, in a faraway land, there was a very old cookbook. This ancient culinary text was written by a man who said the recipes contained within were given to him by a god.  For many centuries, the cookbook is passed down through generations of those who value the sacred art of culinary devotion; even to this day, it is the primary cookbook to millions who, wishing to taste of divine food, use it and cook its distinctive recipes. But there is something within the ancient cookbook that few know about, outside of the elitist culinary schools of its culture. There are some recipes in the book that actually contain poisonous ingredients.

Of course, some prudent chefs over the centuries have altered the recipes. Some have removed the toxic ingredients from their particular copies, only keeping those recipes that have proven to be harmless and satisfying. But for many of them, the cooking schools they have attended appeal to tradition and commitment to the past, and this includes the ancient recipes. They teach that these poisonous ingredients are necessary to make the dishes correctly and to be the best possible chef, one must adhere to the original instructions.  Even though the recipes are harmful,  and the truth about them has become more and more accessible to the world at large, there are still devoted chefs and cooking instructors who insist the dishes be prepared according to the ancient book!

They spread out across the world and open their cooking schools and their restaurants. People actually die eating these dishes. In truth, thousands upon thousands of people die from these recipes. And yet, the restaurants that serve these meals are not closed. The cooking schools remain open. The chefs are not put in jail, though they are committed to the original recipes no matter the consequences.

At first, deaths are attributed to fluke food poisonings. A few times, the chefs themselves have been accused of having a mental illness of various kinds. But after the number of deaths came to total in the hundreds each and every month, the legal authorities had no choice. Finally, after enough people had died…

“An Experiment on a Bird in the Air Pump” by Joseph Wright, 1768



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This painting captures the drama of the Enlightenment. During the late 17thth century, discoveries in the realm of natural sciences gave mankind unprecedented power, as well as unavoidable moral dilemmas. In this painting, Wright forged new territory, focusing on the prominent issue of his day. It’s not inconceivable that the artist himself witnessed this experiment first hand. In this magnificent work, Wright delivers subtle criticism of the philosophical and moral ramifications of European society’s love affair with science during the Age of Reason. In order to prove the existence of oxygen, the traveling scientist places the pet cockatoo under the glass bell. He attaches the tubing to the top of the glass. There is no visible change at first. Everyone in the room is silent. They listen to the sucking sound of the vacuum pump…whoosh…whoosh…whoosh…The elegant white bird begins to jerk and spasm…and then become still.

It is no accident that this scene is cast mostly in shadow. With only a single hidden candle providing light to the room, Wright suggests the absence of moral guidance. We are able to survey the varying reactions of those standing around the table, but the scientist looks to the viewer to decide the bird’s fate. Incredibly, Wright puts you, and every other person who views this work in room 34 of the National Gallery in London, on the spot. What will it be? Life or death?

***

“What sort of an experiment is this? No time to deliberate, no time to discuss the matter? How can you say to me, “Choose quickly!”? It is you who is being paid to provide entertainment this evening, not force this unpleasantness upon us. You have proven the existence of an invisible gas in the air, to be sure, and there can be no doubting its necessity. But time is running out for this poor creature, anyone can see that. Release this bird, sir, you are distressing the children! You said nothing about harming the animal. Come now, you’ve taken this far enough! The triumph of science makes itself known in many ways, surely, and we value science as much as any family does, but we will not entertain cruelty for amusement. Release the bird!”[1]

***

Is the moral dilemma Wright creates in this painting so different from the dilemmas we face today? We want the thrill and advantage of scientific discovery, but at what cost? At what point does experimentation become cruel?

“Science gives us knowledge, a gift that is surely always welcome as providing a better basis for decisions than ignorance. But then science’s lusty offspring, technology, uses that knowledge to give us power, the ability to do things not previously thought to be possible. This is a more ambiguous gift, since not everything that can be done, should be done.”[2]

 

 

[1] Scarlett Clay (2017). Fictional dialogue.

[2] John Polkinghorne, Exploring Reality, Yale University Press, 2005, p. 147.

Published in GreenCraft, May 2017

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I was thrilled to have an article featured in this month’s GreenCraft magazine! The article is a tutorial on how to reuse shower rings and turn them into sweet miniature flower frames. The editors of GreenCraft continually produce a publication that is as lovely to look at as it is informative. You can find GreenCraft in America at Michael’s stores and Barnes and Noble Booksellers. Hope you can pick up one and flip through it, at least. My article is the second one, page 12. Have a blessed week! ~Scarlett

Art Eggs Inspired by Ellsworth Kelly



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These art eggs are inspired by the American minimalist, Ellsworth Kelly. In my last video, I discussed the philosophy of naturalism and how Ellsworth Kelly’s work exemplifies it. As a Christian, I am passionate about the intersection of the arts and faith. I’d love to hear your feedback!

If you’d like to paint some modern art eggs of your own, you can find plain white wooden eggs at Hobby Lobby, as well as the Master’s Touch acrylic colors. They lend well to the imitation of Kelly’s bright hues and simple forms. The 1/4″ red tape is also from Hobby Lobby.

Have a great week and thanks for stopping by to see my art!  ~Scarlett
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