For Small Museum Visitors-Miniature Cord Painting after Regina Bogat



Recently, I created this small replica of one of the contemporary pieces at the Blanton Museum of Art called “Cord Painting 14″ by Regina Bogat. This was done in an effort to encourage discovery and interaction for a group tour for young children, ages 3 to 5 years.

It was time consuming, but worth it.  I started with a small 5″ x 4″ white canvas. After painting it with two heavy coats of cadmium red dark, Using Bogat’s work as the model, I used a needle and poked rows of holes in the canvas, in an organized grid pattern (see photo) with 27 holes from one end to the other.  Only the top third of the canvas was used. I matched the colors of embroidery thread to the actual piece, as best as I could.  Knotting the threads from the back, I sewed them through and double-knotted the ends, snipping off excess thread.  The threads were left at various lengths.

After all the threads were sewn through and knotted, I restretched the canvas back onto the wooden frame by hand, and stapled it back in place.

This was an excellent interactive addition to our tour.  The small children loved to hold, explore, and play with the small piece as we talked about the larger work on the wall.  We looked for favorite colors, guessed what the back looked like, took turns making knots, and used our imaginations to talk about what could be hiding behind the cords!  Overall, the miniature art aided in maintaining short attention spans, encouraging curiosity, and gently redirecting the temptation to touch the art.

Here are the process photos!

Thanks for stopping by and have a blessed weekend.  ~Scarlett


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Bogat 1

Red Bird, Blue Rain

DSCF4006Loosely apply thick acrylic paint to glass and then lay on top of Bristol paper. This paper is 11″ x 14″.

Gently lift glass and let paint dry.

Repeat printing with cloud designs two more times.  Cut smaller clouds from the re-prints, arrange them on top and adhere to paper with 3D mounting tape.  Print and cut out a yellow sun and red bird and add with permanent adhesive.DSCF4007 DSCF4025 DSCF4023


Thanks for looking at my art!  For info. on how to purchase this art, click here.

Have a great week!

~Scarlettred bird, blue rain

Candy Corn Queen 2015

DSCF3879The 6th Annual Candy Corn Queen is here!

This year’s Candy Corn Queen is based on Star Wars’ character, Amidala, Queen of Naboo.  I used ZIG Millenium pens and Coptic markers to create this drawing.  Hope you’re having a blessed autumn season. Thanks for stopping by to look at my art!  ~ScarlettDSCF3901 DSCF3893

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Track on the player: “Across the Stars” by John Williams.

Angels Do Wonderful Things


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Oil pastels were used over acrylic foundation… DSCF3853 DSCF3840

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Music I listened to while working on this painting:

“Fly” by Ludovico Einaudi

You can listen on the MusicPlayer at the top of this post.

Thoughts for this piece:

St. Thomas Aquinas, Summa Theologica, Question #108 Hierarchies and Orders of the Angels

“As we have noticed, our human knowledge of angels is not direct and perfect; we cannot know angels as they are in themselves. In our imperfect way, we assign many angels to each order, even while we realize that, since each angel is a complete species, it has its own specific office, and, to that extent, its own order. We cannot discern what these specific offices and orders are. If star differ from star in glory, much more does angel differ from angel. Our classification of angelic orders is, therefore, a kind of general classification.”

Is there an order of angels that inspire artists? Do angels paint?  If so, can they use light as a medium?


Thanks for stopping by to look at my art ~Scarlett